Rue and racist readers

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Fangirlu Fangirlu 2 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #1295
    Fangirlu
    Fangirlu
    Keymaster

    I saw this on Tumblr, and it’s spot on.  Years later, and I still can’t believe how awful and utterly racist people were when they found out that Rue was a little black girl.

    “I believe that Collins’ construction of Rue as the symbol of innocence meant that some readers automatically imagined her as White. After all, in what universe is an older Black tween innocent? Certainly not in American schools, with the often noted discipline gap. Certainly not in contemporary children’s literature, where Black kids and teens are underrepresented… and when they do appear, are sometimes viewed as “unlikeable” or “unrelatable.”
    Collins also makes the grave mistake of stating from Katniss’ point of view that Rue reminds her of her younger sister, Prim. Prim is a much more familiar figure in children’s literature – the guileless, golden girl child often is the counterweight that balances the evil that the protagonist must overcome, and The Hunger Games is no exception. What is different is that while trapped in the Game, Rue becomes Katniss’ Prim, a younger companion who shares in the existential threat until she is overcome by it.
    This was too much for some readers to take.”
    “Why is Rue a Little Black Girl?” – The Problem of Innocence in the Dark Fantastic by Ebony Elizabeth Thomas (The Dark Fantastic)  (via diversityinya)
  • #1313
    swwoman
    swwoman
    Keymaster

    It was honestly confusing to see that so many people who supposedly read the books freaked out over Rue being black, since she was described as having dark skin in the book. I guess they thought she just had a really fabulous tan. Seriously if you were surprised that Rue was black because you think only little blonde girls are innocent, you’re racist.

    Great article!

    Remember that post I made a couple of weeks back about Amandla’s comic book? In the comment section for the article I linked to on the HuffPost’s Black Voices section, she was getting dragged for not being black since she’s bi-racial. Sigh.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by swwoman swwoman.
  • #1320
    treehouse31
    treehouse31
    Participant

    Oh yes!  I remember that.  And Amandla is getting doubly hit because her mother is black.

    There is a growing divide in how biracial women are treated depending on her mother’s race.  If the mother is white, the daughter gets a pass.  If the mother is black, all hell breaks loose.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by treehouse31 treehouse31.
    • #1321
      swwoman
      swwoman
      Keymaster

      No it’s still there! Up at the top of your post next to the time and date stamp, but there is a time limit of 60 minutes to edit.

  • #1326
    treehouse31
    treehouse31
    Participant

    Oh yes!  I see – thank you!

  • #1406
    Fangirlu
    Fangirlu
    Keymaster

    In the comment section for the article I linked to on the HuffPost’s Black Voices section, she was getting dragged for not being black since she’s bi-racial. Sigh.

    Someone should have told the racists that were dragging her for daring to be Rue in the movies.  And the people that get on President Obama too.  It’s funny how bi-racial is nowhere to be found when they want to call him a monkey, or suddenly not feel sad when Rue died.  Yup…funny how that works.

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